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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)
support for a u.n. vote to recognize independent palestine. peace between the photog grouping and their rival, hamas. mahmoud abbas said that reconciliation between palestinian factions would strengthen the peace process and make a two-stage solution more likely. now, he ullike toet the world on board. the palestinians would like a new state comprising the west bank and gaza strip based on the borders before the war in 1967. the borders are far from the only issue to be resolved. the future of israeli settlements is a bone of contention as well as the future status of jerusalem and whether palestinian refugees should be allowed to return to their former homes. more than half of the member states have signaled support for a vote on statehood. many african nations are lining up support. some european members might come on board perhaps including scandinavian countries and france. germany says that they will not offer their support. they said a u.n. vote to recognize palestine would be counterproductive. >> is the good will is there on both sides, it is possible to get the peace
palestine would be counterproductive. >> is the good will is there on both sides, it is possibleo get the peace process moving. this would be bteha unilateral measures which do not helped. >> barackba has also warned against a unilateral declaration ndependence. >> the efforts to delegimize efforts will end in failure. syol actions to isolate israel will not create independent state. >> obama ppts facing a future state on the 1967 borders. this has angered israel. at the sameimoba ys that the palestinians must honor all previous agreements with israel. as september approaches, analysts s i by no means certain that the u.s. will come to a vote on palestine. either way, the dispute might be about to enter a newha. >> last month the israeli foreign ministry warned that if u d recognizes the palestinian state, the 1993 oslo accords would be null and void. er are israelis who understand their neighbors desire for an independent state and there are palestinians to thinkhau.n. recognition would only make matters worse. listen to what they have to say. >> le llns o i.t. developers around the
. hebrew university is the center piece for his love of palestine as a place for thememto find cultural refuge. >> you know he really disliked nationalism. >> yes. >> and that's what he felt israel might develop into. >> he said it quite explicitly. he said it late as 1946, before the aglo american committee into the state of palestine. this is the committee in which richard crossman was in witcha. the idea of a state is hateful to me. two years before the founding of the state of israel. >> when whitesman died, who offered the presidency to einstein? >> bangurian. wouldn't that have been a disaster. >> there's the famous joke that he said, what do we do if he accepts? but because they considered him to be the greatest jew of the 20th century, they had no choice but to offer it to him. there was no danger he would have accepted. >> let's inquire about whether the world hasn't produced another einstein in the past hundred years. why is it only albert einstein that has been able to accomplish what he accomplished? is it only because of his genius or were there a set of circumstanc
the water supply, israel controlling basically any supply that comes into palestine. >> reporter: mary's greek orthodox family has lived for centuries in the christian town of beit jala, just outside bethlehem. she's close to them, but also dreams of traveling to faraway places. >> i don't care, like, if i have a lot of money. i just care to reay be able to see the world, so yes, that is definitely my dream, but it's not going to -- it's not that easy to make come true considering our situation in palestine. it's very tempting to leave. do we try? yes, of course we try. like basically, obviously no one wants to leave their country, but it is hard. it's a challenge. >> reporter: john is part of the tiny syriac orthodox community. several of his extended family members live in france and britain. he's a chemistry major who wants to study medicine, and he's planning to do so abroad. >> i would like to stay here, but i see that the peace -- the peace process that they are moving in will not achieve itself within the coming few years or within the coming 200 years. so why to suffer and stru
and palestine. in all three cases i think you have gone out and looked at some ways in which we might end up a decade in a place that is very different and we are not, whether it's your thought of really what i would call a strategic distancing from israel, not a rejection of israel but he be prioritized in of our mediation efforts in israel-palestine conflict. india-pakistan i think that's where i was most surprised to read your book. right now there's a lot of talk in washington in particular about the strategic prospects of a potentially invigorated alliance with india. of course, president obama just made the trip there last fall. this falls on actually bush's foreign policy emphasis on building a new and substantively different kind of relationship with india. and really come after the enormous disappointments of a long-term year strategic partnership with pakistan, this is not a new recommendation, we've had a partnership with pakistan, it seems that failed in some key respects. so i want to get back to that. and then, of course, your third area that you look at, which is iran-iraq, th
there seems to be technical difficulties with that. there's the holy sea and the palestine observer mission, but that would be a bit awkward because the palestinians are looking to make a bid for their own statehood late they are month. at any trait u.n. will try to find a way to put them in probably between south africa spained and then it will have to find its diplomatic space. south sudan will most likely find its allies with other states some fear they may be at war in the future with -- whatever the case, it will take some diplomatic musical chairs to steat south sudanese into the united nations. after they get their assets they will come out here and hoist their flags. i am hearing they may rent state in another african mission to make them just one of two u.n. members that don't have their own embassies. becoming a u.n. member is very important for south sudan which gives it sovereignty to the rest of the world it may have rather humble beginnings though. >> talking about recognition, they have got so many things to look forward to. >> south sudan have played their first official mat
. palestine, israel. mexico, as i watch them struggling with their cultural identities and trying to maintain the identities and have the respect as the american citizens they are in this country, it got me to thinking about my family heritage and thinking about how history really does repeat itself. because i know that my people want through these same issues in the famine times when they came. and i thought to myself, why are not more of these stories being told? we need to collect these stories. i am at an age where my parents and their cousins, their siblings, they are getting close end of their life. one of the main ways i collect my information is through oral history i knew time was on the essense. there were stories that would be lost if i didn't collect these stories immediately. and that's what i embarked upon doing. >> i grew up in brooklyn, new york. my experience was landing by birth into an urban town land. my family, my mother is first generation i'm second generation. my grand mother lived in the apartment building with us. i had aunts upstairs. another aunt lived close by. p
. i was born without arms around my heart that wants to embrace everything. palestine's, israelis. japanese, apaches. i am more concentrated with life and love than flags, nationality, religion. that stuff gets in the way. one gets in the way is me, myself, my story. for me, that is why music is liberating. when you hear "imagine" anywhere in the world, people sang the lyrics. as soon as you hear the melody -- same thing with a bob marley song. i grew up taking everything from bob dylan, curtis mayfield, the beatles, smokey robinson. mike alma mater was the streets of san francisco. i would dare to go to school. where i really hung out was at the fillmore. that was my university, checking out be the king, and james brown, a cream. finding out how they were able to penetrate people's hearts. with their music. once you do that, something happens to their eyes. they become brighter. they start crying, they do not know why. they start dancing. it is like when a woman gives birth. =mmfirst, she cries and then she laughs. later on, she dances. and that, to me, is the beauty of what san
him in 2005. he was also the vatican's representative to israel and palestine. archbishop edward o'brien released a statement that reads -- the death of the archbishop is a great loss for the catholic church especially in the united states. as a diplomat and a priest, the archbishop xl through his gentle spirit and infectious goodness. the impact of his work will be felt for many years to come. >> the owners of a baltimore county spa are accused of selling more than a such as. federal prosecutors said the lead spot was part of a multi- state prostitution ring. >> they were very quiet. they did not have wild parties. nothing was going on after 10:00 at night. >> when she moved into her home last fall, lina harrington thought nothing about the house next door. a sign next door to aelite aps. >> the landlady told me they were doing acupuncture and most of their clients were older men who look like they could have back problems. >> in may, she watched as federal investigators kicked in the front door and raided the home. according to the arrest warrant, the house was a brothel where wo
's consensus is we need to solve the problem in palestine like it is our problem, which apparently it is. the remedy is for us to stop caring what any of them think. >> and that brings up a good question. kevin, let me ask you, what is america supposed to do with the israel and palestinian situation? presidents have been trying to do this for what, 40, 50 years now. none accomplish anything. they always say when they get elected the peace process will be a big part of what they do, and nothing comes of it. >> one of the problems with the palestinian issue will always be that american west tried to create states quickly within three or four years. fundamentally we work out that states take a longtime to become secure and then developed and built out. the palestine issue has been going on forever. as a result of that -- by the way going back to the second world war, you have a very, very pro tracted problem. and it will take more than the united states. obama can't fix this one which is why he is walking away from it. when he does it will open a big can of whoop-ass. >> imogen, the majorit
. >> july 26 there will be a debate at the united nations regarding palestine, the possibility of an independent state. to a lot of us it seems a surprise. does this seem like a threatening move to israel to start watching the arab league push for this? h. >> the hope for peace is a negotiated peace. the u.n can decide the earth is flat and they can decide anything, and they have. they can decide anything they want. what really decides the future is what happens here between us and our neighbors and to get peace we need to negotiate the peace. i think to the extent the resolutions are passed and the anti-israeli resolutions are front loaded in the u.n and that pushes them back. it tells them you don't even have to try. you don't have to negotiate. you will always get the approval of a large number of countries. you don't have to make the concessions that you will have to make in order to make peace. typically it is what are the concessions that israel makes. you need concessions from both sides. a one-sided u.n resolution would harden the palestinians' positions and there by pu
in libya. >> when you look at rank order priorities, palestine is number one and the president knows that. u.s. interference, iraq is a huge one. the president knows that. getting out of iraq is critical. libya was way down. it was single digits in terms of how important is this issue to you. and so the fact is -- >> what about what the u.s. did in egypt in getting rid of mubarak? >> they don't see the u.s. did anything. they see tahrir square as doing it. but now they need job aebs economic opportunity. they're not getting those. the president was right in his speech at the state department. we have things to do. but things aren't getting done. we're not investing in the region. we're not turning this arab spring into something that can blossom with new opportunities for people. >> i think one of the shocking things as i found in this report, iran, which is a traditional adversary, iran being a persian country has a higher favorability rating in much of the arab world than the united states of america. >> that is true, but iran is viewed as a menace and a threat in several countries. we'
in palestine because i've gotten very interested in the israeli-palestinian conflict and very interested in the history of zionism. >> host: what was the reaction to your last book, the israel lobby? >> guest: well as i'm sure you know, the reaction here in the united states was loud and almost overwhelmingly negative in the mainstream press. i don't think it would get a single positive review in the united states. the most positive review we got was of israel and more or less than new york -- of israel covered the book in three separate pieces including one major review by daniel levy. all three of the pieces in horowitz were positive so we got a much better -- we got much better treatment in israel than in the united states. >> host: why do you think that is? >> guest: i think it is almost impossible in the united states to criticize israel or to criticize the u.s. is really relationship in the mainstream media and if you do it, he will pay a real price. i think israelis are much more comfortable about themselves and much more aware of their foibles. it is a much more open and free soc
. >> greta: why did you come to the united states? >> i came here to meet with palestine new jobs for the make sure that we are on the same page for the whole volcanic eruption in the middle east around us. >> greta: you came in the middle of washington seized in a discussion about our debt keel chg is sort of having across the world. and how does this affect israel? or debate over the debt ceiling? >> i believe that we cannot be of help. i think my wife to encourage the economy here by buying something. i feel the world is watching america. you know? it's the only super power on earth. we hope of course you come out of this crisis. and if it wasn't for the future. >> and the new head of the imf says it could rattle the world. and if we get our credit rating gets down graded from triple a, it has an affect on every country? >> i hope it won't happen. we have enough much around the country, you know in spain, italy, two weeks now. a lot to worry about in our region. the whole world is looking for the united states of america to come out of this crisis the way it came out from many
nations regarding palestine and an independent state. i want to ask, does this seem like a threatening move to israel to start watching the arab league push for this and a september vote looming? >> i think that the hope for peace is a negotiated peace it is not going to be imposed by un resolution. the un can decide that the earth is flat . the un can decide that the sun is flat and they can decide anything and they have. they can decide anything they want. what decides the future happens here between us and your neighbors and get piece between united states and the palestinians we need to negotiate the peace. the negotiations are front loaded by the un pushes the peace back. it tells the palestinians they don't have to tie and you don't have to negotiate. you will get the approval and you will not have to make the concessions that you have to make in order to make peace. typically the conversation is what concession israel is making. to get peace you have concessions on one side . that would harden the palestinian position and push peace away. in the end of the day, beginning of a re
. >> yes. >> greta: why did you come to the united states? >> i came here to meet with palestine new jobs for the make sure that we are on the same page for the whole volcanic eruption in the middle east around us. >> greta: you came in the middle of washington seized in a discussion about our debt keel chg is sort of having across the world. and how does this affect israel? or debate over the debt ceiling? >> i believe that we cannot be of help. i think my wife to encourage the economy here by buying something. i feel the world is watching america. you know? it's the only super power on earth. we hope of course you come out of this crisis. and if it wasn't for the future. >> and the new head of the imf says it could rattle the world. and if we get our credit rating gets down graded from triple a, it has an affect on every country? >> i hope it won't happen. we have enough much around the country, you know in spain, italy, two weeks now. a lot to worry about in our region. the whole world is looking for the united states of america to come out of this crisis the way it came out from many
to meet with palestine new jobs for the make sure that we are on the same page for the whole volcanic eruption in the middle east around us. >> greta: you came in the middle of washington seized in a discussion about our debt keel chg is sort of having across the world. and how does this affect israel? or debate over the debt ceiling? >> i believe that we cannot be of help. i think my wife to encourage the economy here by buying something. i feel the world is watching america. you know? it's the only super power on earth. we hope of course you come out of this crisis. and if it wasn't for the future. >> and the new head of the imf says it could rattle the world. and if we get our credit rating gets down graded from triple a, it has an affect on every country? >> i hope it won't happen. we have enough much around the country, you know in spain, italy, two weeks now. a lot to worry about in our region. the whole world is looking for the united states of america to come out of this crisis the way it came out from many crisis in the past. and the it has to. >> greta: if you were an israel
do not reconcile israel and palestine? our nest guest says yes, and he may have a plan, after this. somewhere in america, there's a doctor who can peer into the future. there's a nurse who can access in an instant every patient's past. and because the whole hospital's working together, there's a family who can breathe easy, right now. somewhere in america, we've already answered some of the nation's toughest healthcare questions. and the over 60,000 people of siemens are ready to do it again. siemens. answers. but when she got asthma, all i could do was worry ! specialists, lots of doctors, lots of advice... and my hands were full. i couldn't sort through it all. with unitedhealthcare, it's different. we have access to great specialists, and our pediatrician gets all the information. everyone works as a team. and i only need to talk to one person about her care. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> with all the risk and opportunity emerging in the middle east from syria to egypt to iran. our specialist t
east peace process being obviously israel and palestine. it's got to get fixed. in terms of saudi's role with terrorism and with al qaeda, do you think that saudi should be harder and tougher against islamic fundamentalism than it has been? >> well, you know, i'm a member of the royal family but not a member of the government. so i speak very openly and freely. saudi arabia has done an excellent job on that front. king abdullah has really flushed, and his government flushed out many of those terrorists that are in saudi arabia also. you know, in saudi arabia there were many terrorist acts. my tower in saudi arabia, which is the highest priced tower in the middle east, was under threat for two times, and people had to evacuate from there. but the last two years, you have witnessed no terrorist act in saudi arabia. so we have been very successful in flushing out those terrorists and preempting all their strikes. so saudi arabia is doing an excellent job frankly on that front. whenever saudi arabia does a good job, i have to praise them. whenever saudi arabia and the government doesn
of demolishing homes belonging to palestine fighters. a retired colonel said the bulldozer driver couldn't see her because she was behind a pile of rubble. her parents brought the suit. >>> news of the world printed its last paper. a headline of thank you and good-bye greeted readers this morning. they are shutting down after outrage over allegations that reporters hacked in to voicemail acts of families of dead soldier, us of and a 13 -year-old murder victim . >> as i said to the staff this morning, this is not where we wanted to be and it's not where we deserve to be. as a final tribute to seven and a half million readers this is for you, thank you. >> clues in the crossword puzzle mocked the paper's editor when some of the hackings happened. she has been promoted in the company that owned the paper. >> a late night confrontation on bourbon street turned violent. police say a fight broke out between eight to ten people and things escalated. just outside a fast food restaurant. video shows one person pulling a gun from underneath a t-shirt and then firing into the crowd. you see it right
and palestine or all within the concept of the system and if we don't have strong response things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground and a travel to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military you have an incredibly confident will lead military. in the and that's not enough to substitute for the government's of the afghan states and institutions provide and and pushing we just never quite get there. it's hard to find anybody -- >> guest: that's true, too. this brings us back to something like democratization and the culture in their view is going to be something where the people will have a way if you change those that are going to run their government. this is something you can't avoid. when the figures for you don't put other dictators in you can put into place the basic institutions and procedures. >> host: he turned back from these issues in the news of the intellectual argument that the core of your book which is a very challenging one, and you are taking on the basic question - falling as a journalist now for 30 years which is c
, to prevent pakistan from continuing to fail. the idea of a two-state solution for israel and palestine, and they are all within the concept of this international state. that is, we don't have strong response of state. things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground, and i travel often to afghanistan, is to be honest, with all the power of the u.s. military, we have an incredibly confident and well led military. in the and that's not enough to substitute for the governance that the afghans and institutions provide. and so it's like, you know, pushing a rock up a hill. we just never quite get there. i'm sure you wouldn't disagree. it's hard to find anybody, -- >> guest: that is true. but good governance brings us back to something like democratization. something like that procedure and it's going to be their own culture that will sort of be a jerk to interview. but ill be something that people have a way to control and to change those are going to run their government. and this is something you can't avoid when the dictators flow, you don't put on the dictators
deal between palestine and israel has faltered over 50 years of the ground water. >> i think there's a lot more ground water in this country is in the right? so the chances are that as a population booms come as the climate changes and new pressures come on to the water supply your going to be seeing a lot more fights over ground water. what does this mean for guys like t. boone pickens and morris strong is there a future for these guys and these entrepreneurs which privatized water here. environmentally aware enough. i don't predict the future very well. one really did change that was happened over the last 40 years was that we've tended to privatize the science on this. so now it's easier for an investor to hire his own consultants to generate his own answers and the public has a hard time knowing what is the real story. we need to go back to having some independence and science in these arenas. last question denver was the market that morrison legend for his water and denver continues to thrive. what do you think? to use existing to be private water brought at some point? >> cle
and palestine. i've gotten very interested in the israeli-palestinian conflict and very interested in the history of zionism. >> of the reaction to the last book. >> welcome as i'm sure you know, the reaction here in the united states was loud and almost overwhelmingly negative in the mainstream press. i don't think we got a single positive review in the united states. the most positive review we got was in israel and more or less "the new york times" of israel covered the book in three separate pieces including one major review by daniel and all were positive, so we got a much better -- we got much better treatment in israel than in the united states. >> why do you think that is? >> i think it's almost impossible in the united states to criticize israel for the u.s. is really relationship in the mainstream media, and if you do it, you'll pay a price. i think much more comfortable about themselves and much more aware of their affordable, and it's much more open and free society when it comes to talking about israel and the united states. it's quite amazing the extent to which israe
of a two-state solution for israel and palestine are all within the concept of the international space system. that is, we don't have strong systems and things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground when i travel often to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military, we have an up credibly well-led military, but in the end that's not enough to substitute for the poor government there is and the institutions provide, and it's like, you know, we're pushing this rock uphill and we just never quite get there. i'm sure you wouldn't disagree and it's hard to find anybody to defend president karzai's government. >> guest: that's true too. it brings us back to democratization and that procedure and it will be their own culture, but it's going to be something where the people will have a way to control, change those who are going to run their government, and this is something you can't avoid. when the dictators form and dictatorships are in place, there's nothing to do other than put in the basic institutions and procedures forgets responsive
's going to be debate at the united nations regarding palestine, the possibility of an independent state. to a lot of us, that seems a surprise. i want to ask, does this seem like a threatening move to israel, to start watching the arab league push for this in a september vote looming? >> i think the hope for peace is for a negotiated peace, know the to be many he posed u.n. resolution. the u.n. can decide that the earth was flat. the u.n. can decide that the unis is flat and rotates around the earth. they can decide anything and they have. they can decide anything they want. what really decides the future is what happens here between us and between-- and to get peace between us and the palestinians, we need to negotiate peace. i think to the extent that one-sided anti-israel resolutions are frontloaded in the u.n., that actually pushes peace back and tells the palestinians you don't even have to try, you don't have to negotiate, you'll always get the approval of a large number of countries so you really don't have to make concessions, that you have make, in order to make peace because t
for palestinians to take to the streets in massive rallies to force the u.n. to recognize palestine as an independent country. >>> families of nerve victims will meet with attorney general eric holder regarding the phone hacking scandal involving the news of the world tabloid, this arrested cog to a lawyer for some of those families who says the meeting will happen august 24th. say a -- the news of the world closed down earlier this month. it was owned by news corp., the parent company of fox 5. >>> toxicology reports are not due back for weeks but amy winehouse's family speaking out about what they think caused her death. family believes she died from a seizure associated with withdrawal system symptoms from alcohol. >>> a new set of wheels perfect on any driveway or runway even. the latest new flying car we'll show you. >>> they are supposed to be doing work for a utility company but they are accused of committing a crime. details of their alleged big money heist. >>> julie wright has a look at your on-time traffic coming up in just a couple of minutes. ♪ [ female announcer ] s
and that of palestine. secure borders an the status of the refugees of 1948 and their descendants. is an attempt by palestine to delegitimize israel and give their state a reason to keep fighting israel and refuse the alleged right of return to undermine the jewish state. the palestinian authority shoulding plain to its people that a pal stipian state can only be achieved by recognizing an israeli state next door. i urge all member os torte -- to support this resolution and yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady from florida. ms. ros-lehtinen: i'm pleased to yield two minutes to the gentleman from new jersey, mr. smith, chairman of the foreign affairs subcommittee on africa. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. smith: i rise in strong support of h.res. 268 and deeply appreciate majority leader cantor, steny hoyer, chairman ros-lehtinen and mr. berman, the ranking member, for offering this resolution affirming the u.s. commitment to a negotiated settlement of the israeli-palestinian conflict through direct negotiation. h. reds 268 speaks in very clear, unambiguou
of palestine. otherwise this despite risks getting caught up in the instability in the region. curiously i think at one point because of all the changes in the region this is tougher. at another point there's an opportunity and necessity for us to move it forward. >> before i let you go, americans are completely swept away with the young british royal couple and the first visit to the united states and they're sort of british mania here in the states. >> that's good. we like that. >> we're also following this incredible tabloid scandal which has swept up rupert murdoch a huge player here a wl as globally. murdoch has returned to the uk and having to make some changes in his bid for sky tv. how is this possible? we have tabloids here and sometimes they're outrageous and over the top, but this is a violation of the law this hacking scandal, what is your take on that? >> the particular allegations are often absolutely terrible. particularly in relation to really sensitive cases of people having their phones hacked into and so on. the sensible thing is there's going to be an inquire which will
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 62 (some duplicates have been removed)